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How to help your mentee deal with job rejection

At GEM, we believe that young women should be ambitious and unafraid to go after their dream job. As many of us know, ambitious people often face a lot of rejection before they land in a place they want to be. Learning to deal with job rejection is an important part of a young woman’s professional development.

With summer fast approaching, our GEM girls have started searching for summer jobs. Mentors play an important role in all stages of their mentee’s job search, from helping to prepare for the search to dealing with job rejection to celebrating success. Here are some ways to help your mentee deal with job rejection.

Validate her feelings

Many high school students searching for their first summer job may have never faced job rejection before. Being rejected can really hurt, especially the first time it happens. It’s important to let your mentee know that it’s okay to feel down. Interviewing can be very tiring and it’s easy to feel like giving up after not getting the job you wanted. Remind your mentee that she’s not alone; a 2014 Times Higher Education poll found that students apply for 12 jobs on average before getting their first role. Almost everyone goes through job rejection a few times in their lives!

Help her put her rejection into perspective

A high school student may have difficulty seeing the bigger picture, especially if this is her first attempt at getting a job. Remind your mentee that job interview outcomes are not a measure of her success or her professional growth. Interview decisions are made based on all kinds of reasons that may have nothing to do with the interviewee. Tell your mentee that she should measure her success based on her own goals and accomplishments unrelated to the outcome of a job interview.

If you can, share your own story of job rejection with your mentee to help her put her situation in perspective. Emphasize the fact that you continued to learn and grow professionally after the rejection and eventually ended up where you wanted to be. It just takes a bit of resilience and patience!

Talk about next steps

The most important part of dealing with a job rejection is to learn from the experience and continue moving forward. Encourage your mentee to request feedback from the interviewer so she knows what she needs to work on. Although many interviewers will not provide detailed feedback, it’s worth a shot!

Start talking to your mentee about her plan B (or C or D or E!) and discuss how she is going to prepare for her next interview. It’s important to stay positive and energized during a job search. After all, when one door closes, another one opens!

Sarah McNeil is a volunteer with GEM, a recent graduate from Mount Alison University and is currently pursuing her diploma in Corporate Communications at Seneca. She is an avid traveller, photographer and writer. Sarah has seen the power of mentorship in her own life and is thrilled about the opportunity to give back at GEM. Follow her on Twitter: @sarahleamc

Mentorship Tips: How to help a student mentee craft an elevator pitch

In our fast-paced world, a well-crafted speech designed to ‘sell yourself’ in a very short time frame is a crucial component of networking. Most of our mentees have never thought of this. And even if they have, what do they do if they feel like they have nothing to ‘sell’?

Most articles about creating an elevator pitch instruct you to do things like clarify your job target, eliminate industry jargon, communicate your ‘unique selling position’, and use specific statistics if you can. For an inexperienced student, these suggestions mean almost nothing. Yet, having a ready-to-use summary of who you are and where you want to go is an important practice for young women and aspiring professionals.

Mentors can play an important role in helping their student mentee make this transition from school to work. The steps below are suggestions on how you can help your mentee craft an elevator pitch despite a lack of work experience. This exercise is also a great opportunity to help your mentee think more deeply about the kind of career they want to build for themselves.

1. Brainstorm phrases that describe your mentee’s personality, interests, and goals

For example, do they love writing? Are they naturally good with people? Do they have a knack for presenting good arguments? Are they a computer wiz? Explore questions like this with your mentee and write down some phrases that best describe them.

2. Choose one or two key words that encompass their most important attributes and interests

For example, if they like helping others and they’re good at mediating conflicts, they might choose ‘sociable’ as their key characteristic. An elevator pitch must be concise, so it’s important to narrow the focus (even if your mentee has many more wonderful qualities!).

3. Find examples of experiences that demonstrate their character trait(s)

Continuing with the example above, your mentee might demonstrate their ‘sociability’ through volunteer work or a student club they are involved in. If your mentee has no relevant experience, this is a good time to suggest that they think strategically about extracurricular activities. Even something as simple as writing a blog about an area of interest can go a long way (plus it’s free and easy to set up!).

4. Help your mentee connect their characteristics to a professional field

A very sociable person, for example, could do well in a managerial role, in human resources, or in healthcare. A problem faced by many students is that they just don’t know what options are out there. After exploring some of your mentees’ interests and character traits, a conversation about career directions can be extremely helpful.

5. Come up with a phrase that will make them memorable

You want to help your mentee create an elevator pitch that not only showcases their talents, but also helps them stand out from the pack. You want it to be authentic while cutting through the clutter. An example may be, “I am obsessed with being healthy and recently tried Kombocha, a fermented tea drink, now I’m addicted.”

5. Prepare questions that will keep the conversation going

A good question after an elevator pitch is an important part of building the relationship. Your mentees’ question should emphasize their eagerness to connect and learn more about the person they are talking to.

Based on the steps above, here is an example of an elevator pitch and introduction that could be effective for a ‘sociable’ high school student:

My name is Sana and I am in my final year at Newtown High School. I am a volunteer at the seniors’ home in my neighbourhood. I coordinate various kinds of activities for the residents there. I am passionate about working with people and I’m very good at organizing events. I am working towards building my career as a manager, perhaps in healthcare. I’m obsessed with trying new health advice and tips. I recently started drinking kombocha and now I’m addicted. Do you have a health tip that you swear by?

Try building an elevator pitch with your mentee. It might make the difference in their success.

Do you have any tips or tricks on helping others build amazing elevator pitches? We’d love your suggestions!

Sarah McNeil is a volunteer with GEM, a recent graduate from Mount Alison University and is currently pursuing her diploma in Corporate Communications at Seneca. She is an avid traveller, photographer, and writer. Sarah has seen the power of mentorship in her own life and is thrilled about the opportunity to give back at GEM.